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Do Octopus Have 9 Brains

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Brains 3 Hearts: Some Wild Facts About Octopuses

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BOSTON Mythology and superstition have portrayed octopuses as alien beings or evil creatures dwelling in the terrifying dark depths of oceans.

Little wonder, considering they are a bit unusual.

The giant Pacific octopus has three hearts, nine brains and blue blood, making reality stranger than fiction.

Things to know about the giant Pacific octopus, which is naturally found in the waters of the U.S. West coast, the Aleutian Islands and Japan:

NINE BRAINS

A central brain controls the nervous system. In addition, there is a small brain in each of their eight arms a cluster of nerve cells that biologists say controls movement. This allows the arms to work independently of each other, yet together toward the same goal.

THREE HEARTS

That makes sense, considering their bodies are all muscle except for two small plates anchoring their heads, together with a beak used to grasp and bite prey. Two hearts pump blood to the gills. A larger heart that circulates blood to the rest of the body.

BLUE BLOOD

The blood of the giant Pacific octopus has a copper-rich protein called hemocyanin that improves its ability to transport oxygen in cold ocean environments.

CAMOUFLAGE

Theyre able to change their color and texture to camouflage themselves in the blink of an eye, thanks to a complex system of specialized pigment sacs called chromatophores, nerves and muscles.

TOXIC INK

LOTS OF SUCKERS

THE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE

How Smart Are Octopuses

Scientists have discovered that octopuses have the ability to navigate their way through mazes. Also, they have been seen to be able to solve problems quickly and remember those solutions, at least for the short term. Octopuses, however, in laboratory experiments can readily be trained to distinguish between different patterns and shapes. From reports, they have been seen practicing observational learning. Though the authenticity of these findings is contested.

Also, octopuses have been observed in what has been described as play. They have been seen in their aquarium releasing bottles or toys repeatedly into a circular current and then catching them. Most times, they break out of their aquariums and at times into others in search of food.

These octopuses sure behave in ways that suggest theyre smart and highly intelligent. For example, an octopus named Inky made a notorious escape from the National Aquarium of New Zealand. It broke out of its enclosure, slithering into a floor drain and out to the sea.

Animal Behavior Associated With Octopuses

Most octopus species are solitary when they are not mating. However, a few of them are known to occur in high densities. Also, with frequent interactions, mate defending, signaling, and eviction of individuals from dens. This is probably due to the abundant food supplies as well as limited den sites. The octopus species- the pacific striped octopus has been explained to be particularly social. They live in groups that are made up of up to 40 octopuses.

An octopus hides in dens. These are usually crevices in rocky outcrops or other hard structures. However, some octopus species burrow into mud or sand. Octopuses may not be territorial but they like to remain in a home range. In search of food, they may leave the area and navigate back to the den. They comfortably do this without having to retrace their outward route. They are not migratory.

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A Killer Whale Shuts Down Half Of Its Brain When Sleeping

Whales use half of their brains for sleeping and the other half for breathing. The part of the brain that controls breathing stays awake while the other half catches some z’s. Not only that, but the whale keeps one eye open and the other closed while sleeping. It’s called unihemispheric sleep, and dolphins, beluga whales, and sea lions do it, too!

Camouflage And Colour Change

What are some amazing facts about octopuses?

Octopuses use camouflage when hunting and to avoid predators. To do this they use specialised skin cells which change the appearance of the skin by adjusting its colour, opacity, or reflectivity. Chromatophores contain yellow, orange, red, brown, or black pigments; most species have three of these colours, while some have two or four. Other colour-changing cells are reflective iridophores and white leucophores. This colour-changing ability is also used to communicate with or warn other octopuses.

Octopuses can create distracting patterns with waves of dark coloration across the body, a display known as the “passing cloud”. Muscles in the skin change the texture of the mantle to achieve greater camouflage. In some species, the mantle can take on the spiky appearance of algae; in others, skin anatomy is limited to relatively uniform shades of one colour with limited skin texture. Octopuses that are diurnal and live in shallow water have evolved more complex skin than their nocturnal and deep-sea counterparts.

A “moving rock” trick involves the octopus mimicking a rock and then inching across the open space with a speed matching that of the surrounding water.

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How Many Tentacles Does An Octopus Have

All animals in this family have arms, but only cuttlefish and squid have tentacles. Tentacles are not the same thing as arms and can be distinguishable. They are retractable and longer than arms. Also, they have a flattened or spade-shaped tip. In contrast with tentacles, arms generally have suckers along most of their length, whereas tentacles have suckers only near their ends.

In reference to this, it is acceptable to say that octopuses have eight arms and no tentacles, whereas squid and cuttlefish have eight arms and two tentacles.

Did You Know Octopuses Have 9 Brains

Co-founder & Principal Analyst, RedThread Research

Since we started our firm, Stacia Garr and I have been interested in why, during times of crisis, some organizations thrive while others struggle. So much so, that with the kind sponsorship of Glint, we were able to conduct some research to figure it out. And it turned out to be incredibly timely.

With the help of our team, Glint as a sponsor, and over 100 leaders and their ideas, that research is now complete. I’ve quoted the first couple of paragraphs below. Read on!

We were recently surprised to learn that octopuses actually have 9 brains: a central brain to control the nervous system and a small brain in each of their eight arms.1 This means that each of the eight arms can work independently of each other, responding to its environment. Because of this , the octopus is more aware of both disruptions and opportunities.;

We mention this because an octopus is an apt metaphor for the research well be discussing in this report: the idea of responsivity. Organizations with responsivity act similarly to octopuses. These organizations have many brains, and they distribute those brains throughout the organization instead of holding them centrally. These smaller brains enable the many arms of the organization to act independently and respond to their environment while the central brain ensures that they work together toward a larger goal.;

Read the entire report at RedThread. Link in the first comment 🙂

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Finally Why Do Octopuses Have Blue Blood

Are you still wondering why octopus blood is blue and what the three hearts do?

Well, the blue blood is because the protein, haemocyanin, which carries oxygen around the octopus’s body, contains copper rather than iron like we have in our own haemoglobin.

The copper-based protein is more efficient at transporting oxygen molecules in cold and low-oxygen conditions, so is ideal for life in the ocean.

If the blood becomes deoxygenated – when the animal dies, for example – it loses its blue colour and turns clear instead.

An octopus’s three hearts have slightly different roles. One heart circulates blood around the body, while the other two pump it past the gills, to pick up oxygen.

Biomechanics In The Wild

Octopuses Have 3 Hearts and 9 Brains

Picture this: Earth has made its first contact with an extraterrestrial species, and, as to be expected, their anatomy and nervous system are entirely different from our own. Rather than having a single brain where all sensory information and motor controls are processed, they have nine brains. Rather than having a rigid skeleton, they have compact arrays of muscle tissue that stiffen and soften when they move, and their many limbs have an infinite number of degrees of freedom. Oh, and they can only breath underwater, too.

What was just described isnt an alien at all, but actually the complex anatomy belonging to a common octopus, otherwise known as , and there is a lot we can learn from it. So how does an octopus fully control all eight of its flexible limbs? The answer lies in its partially de-centralized nervous system. When most people think of a nervous system, they think of a single brain sending out messages to move our arms and legs, then gathering information back to process everything we touch, see or hear. For an octopus, though, this process is much more complicated.

Independent Thinkers

Master Delegaters

Beyond the Octopus

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NINE BRAINS

A central brain controls the nervous system. In addition, there is a small brain in each of their eight arms a cluster of nerve cells that biologists say controls movement. This allows the arms to work independently of each other, yet together toward the same goal.

THREE HEARTS

That makes sense, considering their bodies are all muscle except for two small plates anchoring their heads, together with a beak used to grasp and bite prey. Two hearts pump blood to the gills. A larger heart that circulates blood to the rest of the body.

BLUE BLOOD

The blood of the giant Pacific octopus has a copper-rich protein called hemocyanin that improves its ability to transport oxygen in cold ocean environments.

CAMOUFLAGE

Theyre able to change their color and texture to camouflage themselves in the blink of an eye, thanks to a complex system of specialized pigment sacs called chromatophores, nerves and muscles.

TOXIC INK

LOTS OF SUCKERS

Adult female giant Pacific octopuses have about 280 suckers in each of their eight arms. Males have fewer suction cups because the tip of their third right arm functions as a reproductive organ.

THE ULTIMATE SACRIFICE

Giant Pacific octopus mothers sacrifice their lives after laying their eggs in deep-water dens. They live with their eggs for up to seven months without eating, ensuring that streams of oxygen- and nutrient-rich water waft over them. Mothers usually die after their broods hatch.

Cunning Disguises And Escape Techniques

Octopuses are maybe the worlds most skilled camouflage artists. They contain thousands of specialized cells under their skin. These cells are called chromatophores. These cells help octopuses to change their color instantly. They also have papilla. Papillon is the tiny areas of skin that can retract or expand fastly change the color of their skin to match the surrounding.

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How Big Are Octopus Brains

Out of any other invertebrate, octopuses have the largest brain to body ratio. Octopus brains are also larger than other vertebrate species, although they are not larger than mammals brains.

Brain size does not always indicate how intelligent an animal is, but as a general rule, animals with larger brain to body ratios tend to have more brain power to invest. Octopus brains are highly complex and specialized, allowing them to do the incredible things that they do.

Neurons are fundamental units of the brain and help to send signals and information from the brain to other parts of the body, and octopuses have a lot of them! Octopuses have around 500 million neurons, which is just about as many as most dogs, which are also incredibly intelligent.

Nearly two thirds of an octopuses neurons are actually located in their arms, which allows them to expertly use their arms to manipulate things, maneuver around and complete tasks.

What Does An Octopus Look Like

Wwwfacebookcomthemedicalfactsdotcom an Octopus Has 3 ...

An octopus is bilaterally symmetrical along its dorsoventral axis. Thus, the head and foot of octopuses are at one end of an elongated body. This serves as the anterior part of octopuses. Its head contains the mouth and brain. Their body is saccular with a head that is slightly demarcated from the body.

At the top of the head are the eyes of an octopus. They are large and are structurally similar to those of a fish. The eyes are enclosed in a cartilaginous capsule which is fused to the cranium. From a translucent epidermal layer, the cornea is formed. The pupil is slit-shaped and forms a hole in the iris behind the cornea. Their lens is suspended behind the pupil and the back of the eyes are covered by photoreceptive retinal cells. Furthermore, the pupil of the eyes can be adjusted in size. There is a retinal pigment that screens incident light in bright conditions.

The foot of this animal, however, evolved into a set of flexible prehensile appendages. These appendages are known as the arms of octopuses. The arms surround the mouth of octopodes. These arms are attached to each other near their base by a webbed structure of tissues. This web of tissue is called the skirt, which joins the arms at the center. The arms of an octopus can be described depending on the arms side and sequence position. A description such as L1, R1, L2, R2.

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Nervous System And Senses

The octopus has the highest brain-to-body mass ratios of all invertebrates; it is also greater than that of many vertebrates. It has a highly complex nervous system, only part of which is localised in its brain, which is contained in a cartilaginous capsule. Two-thirds of an octopus’s neurons are in the nerve cords of its arms; these are capable of complex reflex actions that do not require input from the brain. Unlike vertebrates, the complex motor skills of octopuses are not organised in their brain via an internal somatotopic map of its body.

Like other cephalopods, octopuses have camera-like eyes, and can distinguish the polarisation of light. Colour vision appears to vary from species to species, for example being present in O. aegina but absent in O. vulgaris.Opsins in the skin respond to different wavelengths of light and help the animals choose a coloration that camouflages them; the chromatophores in the skin can respond to light independently of the eyes.An alternate hypothesis is that cephalopod eyes in species which only have a single may use chromatic aberration to turn monochromatic vision into colour vision, though this sacrifices image quality. This would explain pupils shaped like the letter U, the letter W, or a dumbbell, as well as explaining the need for colourful mating displays.

Fun Facts About Giant Pacific Octopuses

1. Giant Pacific octopuses can grow to 29.5 feet wide from the tip of one arm to the tip of another and 44 pounds .

2. Giant Pacific octopuses can change color in one-tenth of a second.

3. Giant Pacific octopuses can be found more than 330 feet underwater.

4. Female giant Pacific octopuses never leave their eggs during the brooding process and die shortly after from self-cannibalization.1

5. Female giant Pacific octopuses lay 18,000 to 74,000 eggs that are the size of a grain of white rice.

6. Giant Pacific octopuses have short lifespans of only 2 to 3 years on average.

7. Giant Pacific octopuses have 2,140 to 2,240 suction cups on their arms, giving them a powerful grip and sense of taste and smell.2

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What Is The Life Span Of Octopus

Some of the species of octopus live for only six months. The large pacific octopus can live only for five years. This is one of the two largest species of octopus. Male octopus will go after few days of mating. Their body will start declining and eventually dead. The female octopus dies after few days of hatching the eggs. This is because she looks after her eggs for seven months and does not eat anything. Thats why she became weak and died.

Watch The Octopus Disappear Camouflage Colors And Textures

Octopuses: Remarkable Intelligence With 9 Brains, 3 Hearts, And 8 Arms!

One of the most amazing demonstrations of octopus camouflage that Ive seen was filmed by Professor Roger Hanlon, University of Chicago.; It shows a seaweed covered boulder turn into an octopus like magic!; And then he reverses the video and you can see the octopus become one with the seaweed and the boulder.; Look at the video below to see for yourself.

Not only does the animal acquire the colors of the background seaweed and boulder but it changes the texture of its skin to match.; There are millions of pigment cells or chromatophores in the skin and millions more of the nerve endings needed to create the skin texture.

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Ability To Recognize People

Octopus contains large optic lobes; these are the brain areas that are dedicated to vision. So this fact came to know that it is important for their lifestyles. Octopuses seem to recognize the species that do not belong to Cephalopoda; these also include human beings. This behavior is not unique to many mammals and can do it, but this is not usual.

How Many Legs Do Octopuses Have

Generally, octopuses have 8 limbs or arms. Most times, people prefer to refer to an octopus with 8 limbs as having 6 arms and 2 legs. In addition to over 2000 observations by visitors, teams of aquatic specialists carried out a study. It was observed that the octopus seemed to prefer using their first 3 pairs of limbs for grabbing and using objects. Thus, according to a Sealife biologist, Oliver Walenciak, it can be assumed that the front six limbs function as arms for octopuses whereas, the back two limbs function as legs.

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